Author Archives: JohnAllman.UK

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And then I go and spoil it all by saying something stupid like … “fag”???

(allegedly)

Birmingham City Council v Shakeel Afsar, Rosina Afsar, Amir Ahmed, Persons Unknown & John Allman

This post was set to be ultra-boring, but then something really unexpected happened.

I started writing this post from Court 205 at 33 Bull Street, Birmingham, on Monday.  Beside me to my left sat Shakeel Afsar.  In front of Shakeel was my barrister, Paul Diamond, and in front of me was another barrister from the nearby Halcyon Chambers, Tom Green, lending his services pro bono for the day.  He’ll be back tomorrow and Friday too.  Today, I sat on the end of the front row next to Paul, where Tom had been yesterday, at the right end of the front bench, directly behind the witness box. Directly behind me sat Shakeel Afsar, where I had sat yesterday.  The trial had been going well, in my opinion.

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Filed under Homophobic, Law, Satire and humour, Songs and poems

Boris Johnson “acted unlawfully”. ~ Does that make him a criminal?

Star post

“Mummy-eee … it said on the news that Boris Johnson had acted unlawfully.  Does that mean he’s a crook and will have to go to prison?”

“I don’t know, darling.  Mr Corbyn and his party will have to decide that.  Let’s wait and see what they say.”

 

^ click to watch Lady Hale reading the official summary of the judgment ^

Read the official summary of the judgment yourself

Read the official judgment in PDF or HTML format

Comprehension questions

  1. Has Boris been “found guilty”, of “breaking the law”?
  2. Is Boris now officially a “criminal”?
  3. Should Boris be impeached? Continue reading

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Filed under Law, Political, Righteousness, Star post

Jeremy Corbyn to succeed Boris Johnson as PM?

I drafted this post a week or so before today’s Supreme Court judgment, which makes the scenario I envisage even more likely to occur.

It is foreseeable that Boris Johnson will resign as Prime Minister (but not as Tory leader) in a few weeks time, rather than send that letter. If so, who will succeed him as PM? The present Leader of the Opposition, of course.

Boris would thus break the record for the shortest term in office of any British Prime Minister, though I doubt we’d have seen the last of him even then. It is likely that Jeremy Corbyn would go on to break the same record as Boris had first broken, by managing to remain PM for even fewer days than Boris had lasted.

We can predict that the first action of Jeremy Corbyn in nominal “power” would be to send to the EU the dreaded, grovelling, statutory letter, pleading for a further “extension”.  A letter that Boris has promised not to send, preferring instead to resign as PM (or, as he puts it, to be “dead in a ditch”), rather than to be caught wearing the PM’s “hat” so-to-speak when the statutory duty to grovel imposed upon whoever was PM that day fell upon the incumbent like the Sword of Damacles.

If the Council granted the requested Article 50 extension, when caretaker PM Corbyn did the necessary statutory grovelling he’d hoped to make Boris do in person, all well and good.  It isn’t particularly exciting to speculate what will happen next in that case.  But (to get to my point) if the Council said “no”, then we would have a far more interesting situation on our national hands.  The conventional wisdom is that Mr Corbyn would have to revoke Article 50, if he wanteed to prevent the no-deal Brexit he seems to dread from happening automatically on 31st October.  But could he revoke?  Hence my still unanswered question posed to a recalcitrant Administrative Court almost three months ago, a question that first occurred to me when the previous PM, Theresa May, made her u-turn, almost half a year ago, admitting that, as far as she was concerned, Brexit “may never happen”.

With no majority, Mr Corbyn would be unlikely to get a Bill through both Houses of Parliament giving him a gold-standard, statutory power to revoke Article 50.  So he would be tempted instead to purport to revoke Article 50 in purported exercise of the Royal Prerogative.  If that happens – and it’s not beyond the bounds of possibility – some might think it a pity that the Administrative Court wouldn’t let me make an application for a declaration that the Royal Prerogative doesn’t give a Prime Minister the power to revoke Article 50, because (I pleaded) only an Act of Parliament could accomplish that. Continue reading

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Filed under #Brexit, Law, Political

The queering of primary schools

In 2017, on this page, in connection with my fifth Parliamentary candidacy, I referred to the threatened queering of primary education.  We have since begun to witness this.  For example there is a well-researched article here about one now-c0ntroversial project, called No Outsiders, that was set up in 2006 with the aim of “queering” primary education.

There has been a rumpus at two of Birmingham’s 258 primary schools, where indoctrination of the children aimed at procuring LGBT-acceptance had been introduced clandestinely, without the knowledge, let alone the permission, of the parents of the children who had thus been indoctrinated.  Or so it has been said.

There has been a jolly informative debate about this in the House of Commons.  The MP who brought that debate has been rewarded with calls for his deselection and deprivation of the party whip.  Charming. Continue reading

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Filed under Homophobic, Human Rights, Law

What would it take to “block” Brexit?

Another court case I brought because nobody else did:

There has been renewed talk lately of “Parliament” (meaning the House of Commons) somehow “blocking” a so-called “no-deal Brexit”, the outcome for which Parliament (meaning both houses) has already legislated, unless the Commons, in a “meaningful vote”, approves a withdrawal agreement that is actually on offer, before the statutory “exit day” arrives.  Exit day has been 29th March 2019, either 12th April 2019 or 22nd May 2019, definitely 12th April 2019, and is now 31st October 2019. Continue reading

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Filed under #Brexit, Law, Political

The day I tried to save Brexit

Another exciting episode in my courtroom drama of a life

Mentle J

As reported here on Tuesday 9th April 2019, I suspected then that the Prime Minister might purport to revoke the UK’s article 50 notice to leave the EU before exit day, then defined as Friday 12th April 2019 at 23:00.  That is, if the Council didn’t give her an extension that night (which, in the event, the Council did).

I therefore attended the Royal Courts of Justice on Wednesday 10th April, clutching these papers.  I was seeking an emergency injunction to prevent the Prime Minister from canceling Brexit off her own bat.  There had been dangerous talk on the BBC news since the Sunday of that week (when I’d listened to Radio 4 online in Bucharest) that led me to fear that summary cancelation of Brexit on the Prime Minister’s part might be her back-up plan if denied her extension.

I have recently obtained a transcript of what was said in court that day. Continue reading

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Filed under #Brexit, Law, Political

Please, miss, please may I watch my son’s school Christmas play?

An episode filmed in the lifelong family tragedy of one child’s ruined childhood, when he was only 4, helped lead to a courtroom comedy more than two years later.

Events including (but not confined to) those caught on camera as shown in the video, led to a court case that ended somewhat comically in 2017.  Comically, but, alas, not happily for the child concerned.

First, the incident that, in part, kicked off the court case.  The following video was shot in December 2014.

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Filed under Children's Rights, Family Rights, Human Rights, Law, Men's Rights, Persecution of Minorities, Police, Political, Targeted