Category Archives: Human Rights

Why you must speak up

John Benton’s piece sets out an important principle. At this point in history, it has a potentially controversial application, so his raising of the matter is timely.

This year, the UK’s secular government forced the leaders of every church in the land to take prompt and draconian decisions, without consulting the rank-and-file congregants of their churches at any sort of meeting.  I am referring to the decision whether the church lockdown sought to be imposed fell within the God-given remit of “Caesar” set out in Romans 13 (and was therefore to be obeyed), or was akin to the prohibition placed upon Peter and John mentioned in Acts 4:18 (and therefore to be disobeyed, replying to the authorities in the same terms as Peter and John replied to the “Rulers of the people and elders of Israel” – verse 8 – in Acts 4:19).

Whether it is right in the sight of God to listen to you more than to God, you judge. 

 

Twenty-two clients of Christian Concern, predominantly in positions of church leadership, brought a test case in the state’s courts in June, challenging the secular legality of the government’s church lockdown. When I applied, a week ago, for the court’s permission to give evidence and to make representations in that case, I learned that the case had been disposed of by way of a consent order behind closed doors.  I have asked the court, the solicitor for the claimants and the Government Legal Department for a copy of that final outcome.  (The Christian Concern website continues to publish that this is still a “current” case.)

My evidence in support of my application to participate in the proceedings that, unbeknownst to me, had been closed with an outcome that the parties seem to want to keep secret, highlighted a difference between the interests of clergy and those of laity (so-to-speak). I feel that difference of interests feeds into the decision on how to apply the wisdom that John has rightly exhorted in this most timely meditation of his.

I wrote [sic]:

The Claimants are predominantly in positions of leadership, office and/or influence within particular churches of a particular type. They are so-to-speak a sample of the clergy, though not numerically representative of all clergy in the UK as regards their churchmanship.

During the lockdown, I searched high and low for a church that continued to meet, despite the regulations that I judged t the time were unlawful, for more-or-less the same reasons as are now pleaded by the Claimants. I sought out local churches all of which I had previously attended, including Anglican, Baptist, Pentecostal, Brethren and Eastern Orthodox – types of churches I had attended locally in recent years.

I am a lay Christian, with a loyalty to Christ rather than to this or that church. I am a fairly good representative example of the Christian laity as a whole. The adverse affect of the impugned decision upon me and the rest of the laity isn’t identical with its adverse affect upon the Claimants. It would add value and save costs if separate counsel [to] represented me directly at the trial of the lawfulness of the regulations, and hence indirectly represented the separate interests of all lay Christians in the process.

 

The original legal papers are here.

My application to give evidence and to make representations is here.

As things stand, my application isn’t being processed at the court, because the court had already “closed” the case before I applied, although the public and the media had not been told this.  However, the subject matter is far from closed as far as I am concerned. When I have more to tell, I’ll post an update on this blog.

In the words of the barrister who spoke for me at the Birmingham trial of Birmingham City Council v Afsar et al (a case about RSE in which we and the public won, although the three named Muslim defendants lost), “losing is winning”. When a secular judge hears a righteous cause pleaded, the secular law is on trial, against the criteria of Romans 13, and God’s holy purposes are served, even if the secular judgment goes against the righteous cause.

Let every soul be subject to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and the authorities that exist are appointed by God.   Therefore whoever resists the authority resists the ordinance of God, and those who resist will bring judgment on themselves.  For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to evil. Do you want to be unafraid of the authority? Do what is good, and you will have praise from the same.  For he is God’s minister to you for good. But if you do evil, be afraid; for he does not bear the sword in vain; for he is God’s minister, an avenger to execute wrath on him who practices evil.  Therefore you must be subject, not only because of wrath but also for conscience’ sake.

Evangelicals Now

Abuse of power is a hot topic these days. And church leaders are able to misuse their authority just as much as anyone else. We believe ‘all have sinned and fall short…’.

In the congregational form of church government (see Matthew 18.15-20), the church meeting acts as the final court of appeal. The elders, or leaders, have a certain authority in the church (Heb. 13.17), but it is an authority subject to the word of God and to the church. Hence it is the gathered church which appoints elders and to whom they must answer if they go astray (1 Tim. 5.19, 20). So the church meeting provides a mechanism for checking and balancing the leadership’s power. It is, I suppose, similar to the House of Lords, which can return Parliamentary Bills to the Commons with the message to ‘think again’.

In a climate which is now extremely sensitive to…

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Filed under Human Rights, Law, Lockdown, Reblogged, Righteousness

The queering of primary schools

In 2017, on this page, in connection with my fifth Parliamentary candidacy, I referred to the threatened queering of primary education.  We have since begun to witness this.  For example there is a well-researched article here about one now-c0ntroversial project, called No Outsiders, that was set up in 2006 with the aim of “queering” primary education.

There has been a rumpus at two of Birmingham’s 258 primary schools, where indoctrination of the children aimed at procuring LGBT-acceptance had been introduced clandestinely, without the knowledge, let alone the permission, of the parents of the children who had thus been indoctrinated.  Or so it has been said.

There has been a jolly informative debate about this in the House of Commons.  The MP who brought that debate has been rewarded with calls for his deselection and deprivation of the party whip.  Charming. Continue reading

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Filed under Homophobic, Human Rights, Law

Please, miss, please may I watch my son’s school Christmas play?

An episode filmed in the lifelong family tragedy of one child’s ruined childhood, when he was only 4, helped lead to a courtroom comedy more than two years later.

Events including (but not confined to) those caught on camera as shown in the video, led to a court case that ended somewhat comically in 2017.  Comically, but, alas, not happily for the child concerned.

First, the incident that, in part, kicked off the court case.  The following video was shot in December 2014.

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Filed under Children's Rights, Family Rights, Human Rights, Law, Men's Rights, Persecution of Minorities, Police, Political, Targeted

Police Scotland doesn’t record its own hate incidents

My report dated 4th October 2018 to Police Scotland of its own hate crime, in the form of a poster bearing Police Scotland’s logo that uses hate speech against religious people, is published here: Police Scotland’s hate crime.

Subsequent email correspondence from Police Scotland to myself in response to my hate crime report, consisting principally of what I refer to as standard fob-off emails 1 and 2, and from me in reply to Police Scotland’s two fob-off emails, is published here: Police Scotland’s bid to wriggle out of hate crime bust.

This morning, I received a typed letter from Police Scotland, by Recorded delivery.

This is what today’s letter said:-

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Filed under Human Rights, Law, Persecution of Minorities, Police

GRA consultation

STOP PRESS!

GRA consultation – DEADLINE EXTENDED!

On 22/10/2018 10:12, Christian Voice wrote:

Subject: EMAIL your Trans consultation – DEADLINE EXTENDED

The Government Transgender consultation website has been so overwhelmed with responses they have extended the deadline to 12 noon today. And we can see that slipping out as well. So whatever time you receive this, as the advert says, just do it. 
Don’t bother with their website. Email your response.

ORIGINAL POST – MY RESPONSE TO THE CONSULTATION

The government’s consultation about the Gender Recognition Act closes on Friday this week at 23:00.  If you care (and you should), please don’t forget to contribute a response in time. Continue reading

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Filed under Family Rights, Homophobic, Human Rights, Law, Political, Righteousness

Police Scotland tries to wriggle out of hate crime bust

I reported Police Scotland’s hate crime a week ago.

This post brings you up-to-date with the correspondence I’ve had with the police since reporting the hate crime.

The hate crime I reported was the display of this poster :-

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Filed under Human Rights, Law, Persecution of Minorities, Police, Righteousness

My email to the police re Alfie Evans

I’ve asked the police please to enable me to serve, on bereaved parents Tom and Kate, my #AlfieInquest judicial review claim against the coroner, challenging his decision not to investigate Alfie’s death.  (Please could I suggest that readers follow this blog who want to be notified automatically by email when I publish the police’s response?)

This is the email I sent: Continue reading

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Filed under Alfie Evans, Children's Rights, Family Rights, Human Rights, Law, Police

The police are NOT “the law”

Star post

It is possible to take the police to court.

A police officer slagged me off in writing in 2014.  I sued the chief constable for libel in 2015.  It has taken a while, but I have finally won a retraction of the false accusations made against me, plus some money, plus my legal costs.  Suing the police involved a lot of waiting, but not a huge amount of work. Continue reading

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Filed under Human Rights, Law, Police, Punning blog post titles, Star post

Talk to me, don’t just starve me to death!

SCOTT’S LAW

Star post

The late Scott Douglas Routley had a nasty road traffic accident around the turn of the century, which damaged his brain.  By 2012, Scott had been comatose, persistently vegetative, “locked-in” – or however you want to put it – for 12 years.   He couldn’t move, or talk. Continue reading

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Filed under Alfie Evans, Disability, Human Rights, Law, Pro-life, Star post, Targeted

Alfie’s inquest?

The claim I promised to make against the Senior Coroner for Liverpool, seeking judicial review of his decision not to hold an investigation into the death of Alfie Evans, was filed at the Royal Courts of Justice today, 27th July 2018. Continue reading

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Filed under Alfie Evans, Children's Rights, Family Rights, Human Rights, Law