Category Archives: Law

Why you must speak up

John Benton’s piece sets out an important principle. At this point in history, it has a potentially controversial application, so his raising of the matter is timely.

This year, the UK’s secular government forced the leaders of every church in the land to take prompt and draconian decisions, without consulting the rank-and-file congregants of their churches at any sort of meeting.  I am referring to the decision whether the church lockdown sought to be imposed fell within the God-given remit of “Caesar” set out in Romans 13 (and was therefore to be obeyed), or was akin to the prohibition placed upon Peter and John mentioned in Acts 4:18 (and therefore to be disobeyed, replying to the authorities in the same terms as Peter and John replied to the “Rulers of the people and elders of Israel” – verse 8 – in Acts 4:19).

Whether it is right in the sight of God to listen to you more than to God, you judge. 

 

Twenty-two clients of Christian Concern, predominantly in positions of church leadership, brought a test case in the state’s courts in June, challenging the secular legality of the government’s church lockdown. When I applied, a week ago, for the court’s permission to give evidence and to make representations in that case, I learned that the case had been disposed of by way of a consent order behind closed doors.  I have asked the court, the solicitor for the claimants and the Government Legal Department for a copy of that final outcome.  (The Christian Concern website continues to publish that this is still a “current” case.)

My evidence in support of my application to participate in the proceedings that, unbeknownst to me, had been closed with an outcome that the parties seem to want to keep secret, highlighted a difference between the interests of clergy and those of laity (so-to-speak). I feel that difference of interests feeds into the decision on how to apply the wisdom that John has rightly exhorted in this most timely meditation of his.

I wrote [sic]:

The Claimants are predominantly in positions of leadership, office and/or influence within particular churches of a particular type. They are so-to-speak a sample of the clergy, though not numerically representative of all clergy in the UK as regards their churchmanship.

During the lockdown, I searched high and low for a church that continued to meet, despite the regulations that I judged t the time were unlawful, for more-or-less the same reasons as are now pleaded by the Claimants. I sought out local churches all of which I had previously attended, including Anglican, Baptist, Pentecostal, Brethren and Eastern Orthodox – types of churches I had attended locally in recent years.

I am a lay Christian, with a loyalty to Christ rather than to this or that church. I am a fairly good representative example of the Christian laity as a whole. The adverse affect of the impugned decision upon me and the rest of the laity isn’t identical with its adverse affect upon the Claimants. It would add value and save costs if separate counsel [to] represented me directly at the trial of the lawfulness of the regulations, and hence indirectly represented the separate interests of all lay Christians in the process.

 

The original legal papers are here.

My application to give evidence and to make representations is here.

As things stand, my application isn’t being processed at the court, because the court had already “closed” the case before I applied, although the public and the media had not been told this.  However, the subject matter is far from closed as far as I am concerned. When I have more to tell, I’ll post an update on this blog.

In the words of the barrister who spoke for me at the Birmingham trial of Birmingham City Council v Afsar et al (a case about RSE in which we and the public won, although the three named Muslim defendants lost), “losing is winning”. When a secular judge hears a righteous cause pleaded, the secular law is on trial, against the criteria of Romans 13, and God’s holy purposes are served, even if the secular judgment goes against the righteous cause.

Let every soul be subject to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and the authorities that exist are appointed by God.   Therefore whoever resists the authority resists the ordinance of God, and those who resist will bring judgment on themselves.  For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to evil. Do you want to be unafraid of the authority? Do what is good, and you will have praise from the same.  For he is God’s minister to you for good. But if you do evil, be afraid; for he does not bear the sword in vain; for he is God’s minister, an avenger to execute wrath on him who practices evil.  Therefore you must be subject, not only because of wrath but also for conscience’ sake.

Evangelicals Now

Abuse of power is a hot topic these days. And church leaders are able to misuse their authority just as much as anyone else. We believe ‘all have sinned and fall short…’.

In the congregational form of church government (see Matthew 18.15-20), the church meeting acts as the final court of appeal. The elders, or leaders, have a certain authority in the church (Heb. 13.17), but it is an authority subject to the word of God and to the church. Hence it is the gathered church which appoints elders and to whom they must answer if they go astray (1 Tim. 5.19, 20). So the church meeting provides a mechanism for checking and balancing the leadership’s power. It is, I suppose, similar to the House of Lords, which can return Parliamentary Bills to the Commons with the message to ‘think again’.

In a climate which is now extremely sensitive to…

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Filed under Human Rights, Law, Lockdown, Reblogged, Righteousness

Boris Johnson “acted unlawfully”. ~ Does that make him a criminal?

Star post

“Mummy-eee … it said on the news that Boris Johnson had acted unlawfully.  Does that mean he’s a crook and will have to go to prison?”

“I don’t know, darling.  Mr Corbyn and his party will have to decide that.  Let’s wait and see what they say.”

 

^ click to watch Lady Hale reading the official summary of the judgment ^

Read the official summary of the judgment yourself

Read the official judgment in PDF or HTML format

Comprehension questions

  1. Has Boris been “found guilty”, of “breaking the law”?
  2. Is Boris now officially a “criminal”?
  3. Should Boris be impeached? Continue reading

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Filed under Law, Political, Righteousness, Star post

The queering of primary schools

In 2017, on this page, in connection with my fifth Parliamentary candidacy, I referred to the threatened queering of primary education.  We have since begun to witness this.  For example there is a well-researched article here about one now-c0ntroversial project, called No Outsiders, that was set up in 2006 with the aim of “queering” primary education.

There has been a rumpus at two of Birmingham’s 258 primary schools, where indoctrination of the children aimed at procuring LGBT-acceptance had been introduced clandestinely, without the knowledge, let alone the permission, of the parents of the children who had thus been indoctrinated.  Or so it has been said.

There has been a jolly informative debate about this in the House of Commons.  The MP who brought that debate has been rewarded with calls for his deselection and deprivation of the party whip.  Charming. Continue reading

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What would it take to “block” Brexit?

Another court case I brought because nobody else did:

There has been renewed talk lately of “Parliament” (meaning the House of Commons) somehow “blocking” a so-called “no-deal Brexit”, the outcome for which Parliament (meaning both houses) has already legislated, unless the Commons, in a “meaningful vote”, approves a withdrawal agreement that is actually on offer, before the statutory “exit day” arrives.  Exit day has been 29th March 2019, either 12th April 2019 or 22nd May 2019, definitely 12th April 2019, and is now 31st October 2019. Continue reading

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Filed under #Brexit, Law, Political

The day I tried to save Brexit

Another exciting episode in my courtroom drama of a life

Mentle J

As reported here on Tuesday 9th April 2019, I suspected then that the Prime Minister might purport to revoke the UK’s article 50 notice to leave the EU before exit day, then defined as Friday 12th April 2019 at 23:00.  That is, if the Council didn’t give her an extension that night (which, in the event, the Council did).

I therefore attended the Royal Courts of Justice on Wednesday 10th April, clutching these papers.  I was seeking an emergency injunction to prevent the Prime Minister from canceling Brexit off her own bat.  There had been dangerous talk on the BBC news since the Sunday of that week (when I’d listened to Radio 4 online in Bucharest) that led me to fear that summary cancelation of Brexit on the Prime Minister’s part might be her back-up plan if denied her extension.

I have recently obtained a transcript of what was said in court that day. Continue reading

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Please, miss, please may I watch my son’s school Christmas play?

An episode filmed in the lifelong family tragedy of one child’s ruined childhood, when he was only 4, helped lead to a courtroom comedy more than two years later.

Events including (but not confined to) those caught on camera as shown in the video, led to a court case that ended somewhat comically in 2017.  Comically, but, alas, not happily for the child concerned.

First, the incident that, in part, kicked off the court case.  The following video was shot in December 2014.

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Filed under Children's Rights, Family Rights, Human Rights, Law, Men's Rights, Persecution of Minorities, Police, Political, Targeted

Schrödinger’s Brexit

On new metaphorical applications of the Schrödinger’s Cat thought-experiment or joke and the need for a new legal test case, in the context of #Brexit


Until an observation forces the system into one of the two equally probable cat-life eigenstates, the box contains the linear superposition of half a dead cat, and half a live cat.

Before we get close again to a default, no-deal Brexit, perhaps next time with no extension on offer, it’d be nice to discover the British PM’s as-yet-undisclosed belief as to the correct answer to an unresolved constitutional question. That question is what the constitutional requirements are for revoking the Article 50 notice already given.

A key question within that is whether there would need to be a new Act of Parliament before the PM could revoke Article 50 notice. What does the PM think is the answer to that? It’s not at all clear from the news what she thinks.

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Police Scotland doesn’t record its own hate incidents

My report dated 4th October 2018 to Police Scotland of its own hate crime, in the form of a poster bearing Police Scotland’s logo that uses hate speech against religious people, is published here: Police Scotland’s hate crime.

Subsequent email correspondence from Police Scotland to myself in response to my hate crime report, consisting principally of what I refer to as standard fob-off emails 1 and 2, and from me in reply to Police Scotland’s two fob-off emails, is published here: Police Scotland’s bid to wriggle out of hate crime bust.

This morning, I received a typed letter from Police Scotland, by Recorded delivery.

This is what today’s letter said:-

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Filed under Human Rights, Law, Persecution of Minorities, Police

What a difference a day made!

Today is the centenary of the birth of my father, Dennis Allman.

(Saint) John Larkin, Attorney General of Northern Ireland

Lee v Asher’s – saved in the nick of time

For want of a nail the shoe was lost.
For want of a shoe the horse was lost.
For want of a horse the rider was lost.
For want of a rider the message was lost.
For want of a message the battle was lost.
For want of a battle the kingdom was lost.
And all for the want of a horseshoe nail.

How easily it could have gone the other way!

 

A race against time

This post is made firstly to the glory of God and in thanks to Him, and secondly in loving thanks to John F. Larkin QC, presently and at all relevant times the Attorney General for Northern Ireland, for his willing instrumentality, skilful and timely, in what I believe to have been a gracious plan of God’s.  Continue reading

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Police Scotland tries to wriggle out of hate crime bust

I reported Police Scotland’s hate crime a week ago.

This post brings you up-to-date with the correspondence I’ve had with the police since reporting the hate crime.

The hate crime I reported was the display of this poster :-

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Filed under Human Rights, Law, Persecution of Minorities, Police, Righteousness